Tag Archives: cabbage

Braised Red Cabbage

anvil

Ingredients:

  • 1             Red Cabbage (outer leaves and core removed, chopped coarsely)
  • 2 TB       Lucini Extra Virgin Olive Oil
  • Salt
  • Black Pepper (fresh, ground)
  • 1              Onion (sweet, sliced thin)
  • 2              Apples (sweet, chopped coarsely)
  • 1/4 tsp  Allspice (ground)
  • 2 tsp       Fennel Seeds
  • 1/2 C     Lucini Cherry Infused Balsamic Vinegar
  • 1/4 LB   Bacon (smoked, high quality, cut into thin strips, optional – can substitute 2 tsp Smoked Paprika)

Preparation:

Pour the olive oil into a saucepan, heat on medium high, then add the bacon (or smoked paprika) and fennel seeds.  Cook until golden then add the onion and continue to cook, with the lid on, for a few more minutes until golden and sticky.  Add the apple, followed by the cabbage chunks, salt and pepper and the vinegar.  Stir everything together well.  Put the lid back on and continue to cook on a low heat for an hour, checking and stirring every so often.

  • 1 red cabbage, sliced 1/4 inches thick
  • Salt and freshly ground black pepper
  • 1/2 red onion, sliced
  • 2 sweet apples, quartered and sliced thin
  • 6 allspice berries, lightly crushed, wrapped in cheesecloth and tied
  • 1/3 cup red wine
  • 1/3 cup red wine vinegar
  • 1/4 cup molasses or cane syrup (the cane syrup is lighter in color)
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Fennel and Cabbage Slaw / Salad

This recipe is very easy (just 3 quick steps) and the refreshing fennel makes such a great partner to the cabbage.  A nice variation on the usual coleslaw.

Ingredients:

  • 1           Fennel bulb (medium, chopped or shredded with mandolin)
  • 1 C       Cabbage (chopped or shredded with mandolin)
  • 1/4 C  sweet Onion (chopped, soaked for 15 minutes in ice water)
  • 1/4 C   Black Olives (chopped, preferably high quality, not canned)
  • 1 tsp    Orange Zest (minced fine)
  • 1/4 C  Orange Juice (preferably fresh)
  • 1 TB     Lucini Gran Riserva Balsamic Vinegar
  • 2 TB     Lucini Garlic-Infused Extra Virgin Olive Oil

Preparation:

Soak the onion in ice water to mellow flavor.  Mix the zest, orange juice, vinegar and olive oil in a bowl in emulsified.  Combine all of the vegetables in a serving bowl and top with the emulsification.  Refrigerate for one hour.

Cole Slaw

This is a great recipe for a sweet, vinegar based cole slaw.  I do like mayonnaise and buttermilk slaws as well, but this version brings back memories of summer evenings warm enough to eat outside and veggies freshly picked from the garden.  Cole slaw is a must for barbecues and picnics, fried chicken and hot dogs, friday night fish fries and pot lucks at the town park.   Sometimes referred to as “German” or “Carolina” cole slaw, I prefer the vinegar version with fresh cabbage from the garden or farmers market, as it balances well with the earthier flavor of non-mass farmed cabbages.

I always assumed that the name came from a person or place named “Cole”, but the name is actually an Anglicization of the Dutch term “koolsla”, itself from “koolsalade”, which means “cabbage salad” in Dutch.  “Kool” and “Cole” derive from the Latin, colis, meaning “cabbage”.  Kool.

Colorful cole slaw

Colorful cole slaw

Ingredients:

  • 4 C        Cabbage (Green and or Red)
  • 1            Onion (small, minced)
  • 1            Carrot  (peeled, coarsely grated)
  • 1            Bell Pepper (red or yellow for color, sliced fine)
  • 1⁄3 C     Lucini Pinot Grigio Italian Wine Vinegar
  • 1⁄2 tsp  Dry Mustard
  • 1⁄2 tsp  Celery Seed
  • 1⁄2 tsp  Salt
  • 1⁄4 tsp  Black Pepper (fresh, ground)
  • 1⁄4 C      Sugar
  • 1⁄4 C     Lucini Tuscan Basil Infused Extra Virgin Olive Oil

Preparation:
Toss shredded and minced vegetables together in a large bowl.  Combine sugar, salt, pepper celery seed, mustard seed, vinegar, and pepper; whisk together. Toss with vegetables; cover and refrigerate for several hours or overnight.  Taste for sweetness and spices – many people prefer more sugar.

St. Patrick’s Day is More Than Just Corned Beef

For those of us with Irish heritage – and those without! – St. Patrick’s Day signals the best Eire has to offer. For the traditional St. Paddy’s celebration, most think of the classic corned beef and cabbage with soda bread (recipe follows) and Guinness. Well, think again!

Much celebrated Irish chef, Paul Flynn, has recreated Irish cuisine and changed Ireland’s foodscape forever. The likes of  Bacon and Cabbage Soup (recipe follows), Seared Salmon with Raisin and Caper Butter, and Turnip, Potato, and Smoked Mackerel Gratin are the hallmarks of this Irish foodie’s genius; the subtle blending of tradition with a modern twist.

And the best part? You can use Lucini Extra Virgin Olive Oil in place of butter when sauteing.

Mini Walnut Soda Bread

Mini Walnut Soda Bread

Corned Beef and Cabbage

Corned Beef and Cabbage

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Brown Soda Bread

Ingredients

  • 1½ lbs white flour
  • 5 ozs wholemeal Flour
  • 5 ozs bran
  • 1 level teaspoon bread soda
  • 1 level teaspoon cream of tartar
  • 4 ozs melted butter
  • 3 ozs brown or caster sugar
  • 4 eggs beaten
  • ½ teaspoon nutmeg {optional}
  • Sesame seeds
  • This mixture makes 4×2 lb loaf
  • Cook at Gas 5 for about 1 ½ hrs

Method

  • Sieve white flour and bread soda
  • Add wholemeal Flour, bran baking powder, cream of tartar, sugar and nutmeg
  • Mix to a wet dough with melted butter, eggs and fresh milk
  • Divide equally between 4 greased 2 lb loaf tins
  • Sprinkle tops with sesame seeds
  • Bake in a moderate oven for about 1½ hours or until cooked
  • When cooked each cake can be sliced and put in the deep freeze

Bacon and Cabbage Soup

March 2007 |  epicurious.com |  Editor’s Note: This recipe is adapted from chef Paul Flynn of The Tannery in Dungarvan, Ireland.

In Ireland, boiled bacon and cabbage is a domestic staple. The bacon is usually a “collar” or shoulder, a moderately marbled cut with less fat than American bacon but a bit more than Canadian. The ingredients are boiled together and served with potatoes and a parsley cream sauce.

Among contemporary Irish chefs, it’s become popular to reinvent this hearty, homey recipe in the more rarefied form of bacon and cabbage terrine. Flynn’s version, however, stays closer to dish’s comforting roots, while adding a touch of elegance.

Yield: Makes 4 servings

1 (1/3-pound) piece Irish bacon (available at specialty foods shops) or Canadian bacon
3 tablespoons unsalted butter
1 medium onion, finely chopped
2 large Yukon Gold potatoes, peeled and cut into 1/2-inch dice
5 1/2 cups chicken stock or low-sodium chicken broth
4 Turkish bay leaves
2 teaspoons kosher salt
1/2 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper
1/2 small head Savoy cabbage, cored, thinly sliced, and cut into 1/2-inch pieces
preparation

In small saucepan, combine bacon and cold water to cover. Cover, bring to boil over moderate heat, and skim foam from surface. Reduce heat and simmer 7 minutes. Drain and cool, then cut into 1-inch chunks. Set aside.

In 6-quart heavy stock pot over moderate heat, melt butter. Add onion and sauté, stirring, until softened, about 3 minutes. Add potatoes and sauté 2 minutes. Add stock, bay leaves, salt, and pepper and bring to boil. Reduce heat to moderately low, cover, and simmer until potatoes are soft, about 8 to 10 minutes. Add cabbage and simmer 5 additional minutes. Discard bay leaves. Working in 3 batches, in blender purée soup until smooth (using caution when blending hot liquids). Return to pot, stir in bacon, and rewarm if necessary. Ladle soup into bowls and serve.

In 6-quart heavy stock pot over moderate heat, melt butter. Add onion and sauté, stirring, until softened, about 3 minutes. Add potatoes and sauté 2 minutes. Add stock, bay leaves, salt, and pepper and bring to boil. Reduce heat to moderately low, cover, and simmer until potatoes are soft, about 8 to 10 minutes. Add cabbage and simmer 5 additional minutes. Discard bay leaves. Working in 3 batches, in blender purée soup until smooth (using caution when blending hot liquids). Return to pot, stir in bacon, and rewarm if necessary. Ladle soup into bowls and serve.