St. Patrick’s Day is More Than Just Corned Beef

For those of us with Irish heritage – and those without! – St. Patrick’s Day signals the best Eire has to offer. For the traditional St. Paddy’s celebration, most think of the classic corned beef and cabbage with soda bread (recipe follows) and Guinness. Well, think again!

Much celebrated Irish chef, Paul Flynn, has recreated Irish cuisine and changed Ireland’s foodscape forever. The likes of  Bacon and Cabbage Soup (recipe follows), Seared Salmon with Raisin and Caper Butter, and Turnip, Potato, and Smoked Mackerel Gratin are the hallmarks of this Irish foodie’s genius; the subtle blending of tradition with a modern twist.

And the best part? You can use Lucini Extra Virgin Olive Oil in place of butter when sauteing.

Mini Walnut Soda Bread

Mini Walnut Soda Bread

Corned Beef and Cabbage

Corned Beef and Cabbage

____________________________________

Brown Soda Bread

Ingredients

  • 1½ lbs white flour
  • 5 ozs wholemeal Flour
  • 5 ozs bran
  • 1 level teaspoon bread soda
  • 1 level teaspoon cream of tartar
  • 4 ozs melted butter
  • 3 ozs brown or caster sugar
  • 4 eggs beaten
  • ½ teaspoon nutmeg {optional}
  • Sesame seeds
  • This mixture makes 4×2 lb loaf
  • Cook at Gas 5 for about 1 ½ hrs

Method

  • Sieve white flour and bread soda
  • Add wholemeal Flour, bran baking powder, cream of tartar, sugar and nutmeg
  • Mix to a wet dough with melted butter, eggs and fresh milk
  • Divide equally between 4 greased 2 lb loaf tins
  • Sprinkle tops with sesame seeds
  • Bake in a moderate oven for about 1½ hours or until cooked
  • When cooked each cake can be sliced and put in the deep freeze

Bacon and Cabbage Soup

March 2007 |  epicurious.com |  Editor’s Note: This recipe is adapted from chef Paul Flynn of The Tannery in Dungarvan, Ireland.

In Ireland, boiled bacon and cabbage is a domestic staple. The bacon is usually a “collar” or shoulder, a moderately marbled cut with less fat than American bacon but a bit more than Canadian. The ingredients are boiled together and served with potatoes and a parsley cream sauce.

Among contemporary Irish chefs, it’s become popular to reinvent this hearty, homey recipe in the more rarefied form of bacon and cabbage terrine. Flynn’s version, however, stays closer to dish’s comforting roots, while adding a touch of elegance.

Yield: Makes 4 servings

1 (1/3-pound) piece Irish bacon (available at specialty foods shops) or Canadian bacon
3 tablespoons unsalted butter
1 medium onion, finely chopped
2 large Yukon Gold potatoes, peeled and cut into 1/2-inch dice
5 1/2 cups chicken stock or low-sodium chicken broth
4 Turkish bay leaves
2 teaspoons kosher salt
1/2 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper
1/2 small head Savoy cabbage, cored, thinly sliced, and cut into 1/2-inch pieces
preparation

In small saucepan, combine bacon and cold water to cover. Cover, bring to boil over moderate heat, and skim foam from surface. Reduce heat and simmer 7 minutes. Drain and cool, then cut into 1-inch chunks. Set aside.

In 6-quart heavy stock pot over moderate heat, melt butter. Add onion and sauté, stirring, until softened, about 3 minutes. Add potatoes and sauté 2 minutes. Add stock, bay leaves, salt, and pepper and bring to boil. Reduce heat to moderately low, cover, and simmer until potatoes are soft, about 8 to 10 minutes. Add cabbage and simmer 5 additional minutes. Discard bay leaves. Working in 3 batches, in blender purée soup until smooth (using caution when blending hot liquids). Return to pot, stir in bacon, and rewarm if necessary. Ladle soup into bowls and serve.

In 6-quart heavy stock pot over moderate heat, melt butter. Add onion and sauté, stirring, until softened, about 3 minutes. Add potatoes and sauté 2 minutes. Add stock, bay leaves, salt, and pepper and bring to boil. Reduce heat to moderately low, cover, and simmer until potatoes are soft, about 8 to 10 minutes. Add cabbage and simmer 5 additional minutes. Discard bay leaves. Working in 3 batches, in blender purée soup until smooth (using caution when blending hot liquids). Return to pot, stir in bacon, and rewarm if necessary. Ladle soup into bowls and serve.

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